Author Topic: source of ignition  (Read 461 times)

Offline screech

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source of ignition
« on: May 30, 2017, 06:31:15 PM »
I can't believe I am asking this question but I can't get a straight answer from other gas techs or even a couple of electricians everyone has a different answer . Is an outdoor light fixture a source of ignition ? I always stay 10 feet from a propane regulator but another tech says it doesn't matter .
Thanks

Offline Porcupinepuffer

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Re: source of ignition
« Reply #1 on: May 30, 2017, 07:47:33 PM »
The below pdf from NWT seems to say it's not considered a source of ignition. Didn't find anything obvious for Ontario

http://www.pws.gov.nt.ca/sites/www.pws.gov.nt.ca/files/01._clarification_of_rules_on_propane.pdf

But... what if it's one of those fixtures where the customer unscrews the bulb and screws in one of those plug adapters to use it as an outdoor extension cord? Or how about cx replacing the light fixture with a motion sensor floodlight that is now officially considered a source of ignition since it has it's own switching/relay? Given the height of most outdoor light fixtures, I've never had this issue. I'd like to see where it may be more specific in code that it's not considered a source. A high wattage bulb with a bad socket is a source of ignition. A bulb that explodes is a source of ignition.

Offline Admin

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Re: source of ignition
« Reply #2 on: May 30, 2017, 09:06:42 PM »
That's a very interesting interpretation you found.  We should ask the TSSA and ESA if they consider a standard outdoor light fixture to be arc-producing.

Every propane or natural gas inspector I have dealt with will treat the light fixture as a source of ignition.  I think you can only use light fixtures rated for Class 1 Zone 2 environments.

The following is from the OESC 26th Edition,

Quote
2-324 Electrical equipment near combustible gas equipment (see Appendix B)
The clearance distance between arc-producing electrical equipment and a combustible gas relief device or vent shall be in accordance with the requirements of CSA B149.1.

Appendix B
Rule 2-324 The clearance distances specified in CSA B149.1 between a source of ignition and a combustible gas relief discharge device or vent are as follows:
    * (a)  1 m for natural gas; and
    * (b)  3 m for propane gas.

Offline screech

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Re: source of ignition
« Reply #3 on: June 05, 2017, 05:05:55 AM »
Thank you .I wanted to call TSSA but the last time I called they told me it would be about a month before anyone could get back to me

Offline Porcupinepuffer

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Re: source of ignition
« Reply #4 on: June 05, 2017, 12:45:24 PM »
Thank you .I wanted to call TSSA but the last time I called they told me it would be about a month before anyone could get back to me

That's still unusually fast for most bureaucracies.

Offline Admin

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Re: source of ignition
« Reply #5 on: June 05, 2017, 01:50:06 PM »
You'll get a faster reply by email.

fuels_technical_services@tssa.org

I just emailed them and will report back with their answer.

The Enbridge inspectors do consider exterior light fixtures to be a source of ignition, but also said this issue is before their engineering department, so changes could be coming.

Offline Admin

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Re: source of ignition
« Reply #6 on: June 06, 2017, 01:19:34 PM »
Reply from the TSSA,

Quote
Yes, in Ontario a light fixture is considered a source of ignition. Only if the light fixture is “intrinsically safe” would it not be considered a source of ignition.

Offline screech

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Re: source of ignition
« Reply #7 on: June 17, 2017, 03:19:35 PM »
Thank you  ;D