Author Topic: Electrical Connections - Condensate Pump  (Read 1145 times)

Offline Attavior

  • ***
  • Posts: 50
Electrical Connections - Condensate Pump
« on: July 28, 2017, 03:27:42 PM »

I've been informed by a gas inspector that the Building Code/Electrical Code has changed since July 1st, and condensate pumps are now required to be connected by a GFI at the Furnace?  Any one else hear this or can confirm that this is actually the case? 

Offline Admin

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 2226
    • HVAC TECH GROUP
Re: Electrical Connections - Condensate Pump
« Reply #1 on: July 28, 2017, 04:49:00 PM »
The changes were made to OESC Rule 26-724(f), regarding AFCI circuits. (Arc-Fault Circuit Interrupter)

Download the ESA Technical Corner Document - Here

I also posted a picture from the March 2017 OESC Bulletins below.  See Questions 1 and 2.

Quote
Rule 26-724 Branch circuits for dwelling units (see Appendix B)
This Rule applies to branch circuits for dwelling units (including single dwellings) as follows:
(a) branch circuits from a panelboard installed in accordance with Rule 26-400 shall not be connected to outlets or electrical equipment in any other dwelling unit;
(b) except as may be permitted by Items (c) and (d), at least two branch circuits shall be provided for receptacles (5-15R split or 5-20R) installed for kitchen counters of dwelling units in accordance with Rule 26-712(d)(iii), (iv), and (v); and
(i) no more than two receptacles shall be connected to a branch circuit; and
(ii) no other outlets shall be connected to these circuits;
(c) notwithstanding Item (b), where the provisions of Rule 26-712(d)(iii) require only one receptacle, only one branch circuit need be provided;
(d) notwithstanding Item (b)(i), receptacles identified in Rule 26-710(d) shall be permitted to be connected to those receptacles required by Rule 26-712(d)(iii), even though the circuit already supplies two receptacles;
(e) receptacles installed in accordance with Rule 26-712(d)(vi) shall be supplied by a branch circuit that does not supply any other outlets, except that a receptacle required by Rule 26-712(d)(ii) shall also be permitted to be supplied by this branch circuit;
(f) each branch circuit supplying 125 V receptacles rated 20 A or less shall be protected by a combination-type arc-fault circuit interrupter, except for branch circuits supplying

Delete CE Code Rule 26-724(f)(i) and replace with the following:
(i) receptacles installed in accordance with
(A) Rule 26-710(f) provided no other receptacles are connected to these circuits; or
(B) Rules 26-710(d), 26-712(d)(i), (iii), (iv), and (v); and
(i) receptacles installed in accordance with
(A) Rule 26-710(f); or
(B) Rule 26-712(d)(i), (iii), (iv), and (v); and
(ii) a single receptacle for a sump pump where
(A) the receptacle is labelled in a conspicuous, legible, and permanent manner identifying it as a sump pump receptacle; and
(B) the branch circuit does not supply any other receptacles; and
(g) notwithstanding Item (f), the entire branch circuit need not be provided with arc-fault protection where
(i) an outlet branch-circuit-type arc-fault circuit interrupter is installed at the first outlet on the branch circuit; and
(ii) the wiring method for the portion of the branch circuit between the branch circuit overcurrent device and the first outlet consists of metal raceway, armoured cable, or non-metallic conduit or tubing.

The AFCI should not be confused with the GFCI. The AFCI (Arc Fault Circuit Interrupter) protects against fires caused by arcing faults. Arcing faults often occur in damaged or deteriorated wires and cords.  The GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter) is designed to protect people from severe or fatal electric shocks.[/quote]

It's not necessary to replace the breaker with AFCI, you just have to use an AFCI receptacle for the condensate pump.

Offline Porcupinepuffer

  • Pro Tech™
  • *****
  • Posts: 433
Re: Electrical Connections - Condensate Pump
« Reply #2 on: July 28, 2017, 05:04:54 PM »
 I've heard about this for a while from certain people using plugs. First it was regular plugs instead of tamper proof ones, and then gfci.  I just hard-wire them into the furnace and haven't had any issues from inspectors.

Offline Attavior

  • ***
  • Posts: 50
Re: Electrical Connections - Condensate Pump
« Reply #3 on: July 29, 2017, 06:24:37 AM »
Thanks.  Good to know.  This all started because a previous installer cut the 3 prong plug in for the condensate and hardwired it into the furnace after drilling a hole to fish the wire thru the sheet metal.

Offline Sergroum

  • Pro Tech™
  • *****
  • Posts: 111
Re: Electrical Connections - Condensate Pump
« Reply #4 on: July 29, 2017, 09:11:36 AM »
Hm. That is a pretty common practice. I dont even know how many ... thousands of times I've seen that done. And this is now against code? Whoa, good to know.

Offline mattmctree

  • 313D Supporter
  • ****
  • Posts: 83
Re: Electrical Connections - Condensate Pump
« Reply #5 on: September 27, 2017, 06:45:43 PM »
I 've always hard wired it in with the electrical supply for the furnace.  Obviously using proper connectors and grommets. It seems kind of ridiculous to be against code. I also can't find anything stating it can't be done in the gas code

Offline Admin

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 2226
    • HVAC TECH GROUP
Re: Electrical Connections - Condensate Pump
« Reply #6 on: September 28, 2017, 05:34:59 AM »
The Gas Code says,

Quote
4.7.1 - Electrical connections between an appliance and building wiring shall comply with the local electrical code or, in the absence of such, with the Canadian Electrical Code, Part I.

The Electrical Code would apply if you were adding a new receptacle at the furnace for the condensate pump.  Maybe hardwiring the pump to the furnace power supply is a loop hole.  Technically any wiring installed below 5' from the floor requires protection, so I've always wondered if we should be installing a conduit over the cord or using BX wiring.

Offline DaveP

  • Pro Tech™
  • *****
  • Posts: 29
Re: Electrical Connections - Condensate Pump
« Reply #7 on: September 28, 2017, 07:47:52 AM »
I've been told by ESA inspectors to avoid the AFCI, cut the cord and use a proper "stain relief connector" for cabtyre.  I would think the fact the pump is a device with an approved cord attached would negate the requirement to protect the wire.