Author Topic: CSST GROUNDING?  (Read 2601 times)

Offline danjhk

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CSST GROUNDING?
« on: September 18, 2019, 07:40:35 PM »
Hi,

I have some CSST for my gas inlet into my hot water tank. I was told I don't have the proper bonding/ground for it??

I was wondering if this screw that goes into the ground constitutes sufficient grounding within TSSA regulations??

Any help would be appreciated.

Thank you


Regards,

Daniel K

Offline NoDIY

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Re: CSST GROUNDING?
« Reply #1 on: September 18, 2019, 09:48:47 PM »
no.

Follow the latest bulletin
As well consult with you CSST installation manual.

https://www.esasafe.com/assets/files/esasafe/pdf/Bulletins/10-14-8.pdf

Offline Admin

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Re: CSST GROUNDING?
« Reply #2 on: September 19, 2019, 12:14:14 PM »
What kind of CSST is it?

If it's Gastite and your grounding rod is in fact a grounding rod then it would already be considered bonded.  It does not require additional upstream bonding.  I've never seen anything but bonding wire used and I'm not familiar with that type of ground rod connection.  Without approval from the ESA or TSSA I could see why an inspector would question it. 

You can download the Gastite Technical Bulletin #TB2014-01 - Here

This would apply to your grounding electrode,

Quote
The bonding conductor is permanently and directly connected to the electrical service grounding electrode system of the premises. This connection can be made at either:
- Bonding buss
- Grounding electrode conductor
- Grounding electrode

Quote
The gas piping system shall be considered to be direct-bonded when
installed in accordance with the following,

A single bond clamp attachment to rigid pipe or rigid component at any point within the gas piping system

Bonding conductor is #6 AWG copper (minimum) or equivalent, and not exceeding 75 feet in length

BTW what is that black ABS running under the WH?

Offline Sergroum

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Re: CSST GROUNDING?
« Reply #3 on: September 20, 2019, 01:34:45 AM »
the grounding rod that is used to ground the electrical panel goes into the ground by six feet. The plumping copper piping that's connected to the meter goes into the soil by many many feet. Somehow I doubt your threaded rod is in any way similar. So ... no, it's definitely not serving the same function as any kind of grounding that is used normally.

Offline Porcupinepuffer

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Re: CSST GROUNDING?
« Reply #4 on: September 20, 2019, 04:06:13 AM »
That's nothing more then a support hanger used incorrectly in reverse. Not a chance it would be considered an approved way of grounding since it doesn't go into the ground at proper depth. Real grounding goes deep into the soil for proper conductivity, while this rod just has some concrete anchors in the cement floor.

Offline Admin

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Re: CSST GROUNDING?
« Reply #5 on: September 20, 2019, 03:30:02 PM »
I think we're going to see more changes to the Code soon.  When it comes to CSST and bonding the OESC rules seem very unclear.  The OESC Bulletin shows bonding hop scotching upstream and downstream of the CSST, but then says,

Quote
The OESC does not include requirements for bonding Corrugated Stainless Steel Tubing (CSST), (Photo B1). If bonding is necessary, the location of bonding connections and connection method should be according to the manufacturers directions and shall meet the requirement of the TSSA.
 

Look at the attached picture from the OESC Bulletin.  Why does it show bonding downstream at the furnace but not the stove, if they both have an electrical supply?  Why does the water heater, which has no electrical supply, not have downstream bonding?  I know with Gastite the single upstream bonding connection would be adequate and no downstream bonding would be required as shown on the furnace in the OESC Bulletin.  The same applies when using Wardlfex and TracPipe CSST.  If we use FlashShield, Wardflex II or CounterStrike CSST they are treated the same as black steel and no bonding is required if the appliances have electrical connections.

The OESC Bulletin also says,

Quote
The requirement in Rule 10-700 c) to provide equipotential bonding to a metal gas piping system is not intended to apply to metal gas tubing.

Bonding metal gas tubing by conventional means can create a hazardous situation where the tubing can be punctured by or by arcing between improperly secured bonding means during faults or lightning strikes.

The last time I checked copper was a type of metal, so they are saying metal tubing will still require bonding.  For example, even if the gas fireplace has an electrical connection, if you used copper gas tubing you would need bonding.  I think when the OESC Bulletin says metal tubing they are likely referring to CSST only and not copper, but this should be clarified.  There should be no issue treating copper tubing the same you would black steel piping and not require bonding if the appliance has an electrical connection.  The ground wire is after all made of copper.