Author Topic: Dizzy  (Read 2315 times)

Offline Medic1982

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Dizzy
« on: April 04, 2019, 09:53:58 AM »
Looking for some advice.
Last week my next door neighbor installed a high efficiency furnace. Intake and exhaust are located on the side of her house where my driveway is.
I had a work place CO poisoning many years ago and since I find I am very sensitive to even small amounts of CO and find I`m getting dizzy when I`m outside around it.
The installer put an extended exhaust tube so it sits above my truck, about 7 feet above the ground level so it would not be hit backing in.
I have 2 questions
First one is after a new install does the furnace need to be tuned, is this why I`m feeling like this.
Second could the exhaust not be run up through the chimney and avoid the exhaust in the driveway.
Looking for any advice on this problem
Thank you very much. 

Offline Admin

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Re: Dizzy
« Reply #1 on: April 04, 2019, 10:19:59 AM »
I'm surprised the exhaust is even reaching you below if it's installed 7' high.  Most installers will check the manifold gas pressure to make sure it's not over-fired.  A new furnace should not be producing any CO.

From the B149.1-15 gas Code

Quote
Clause 8.14.8 - A vent shall not terminate
(a) where it may cause hazardous frost or ice accumulations on adjacent property surfaces;
(b) less than 7 ft (2.1 m) above a paved sidewalk or a paved driveway that is located on public property;

Now Clause 8.14.8(a) has been revoked so we can't use that.  The installer only needed to raise the vent to 7' if the property was public.  At the end of the day if the vent protrudes onto your property just call Bylaw and tell them you want it moved.  There are lot lines and the neighbors vent should not be within 1' of your lot line, according to most Bylaw's.

If the chimney is already being used you could not vent the furnace up it.  If the chimney is abandoned and not connected to any other gas or solid fuel appliance, then yes the plastic vents could be installed up the chimney.

Offline Sergroum

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Re: Dizzy
« Reply #2 on: April 04, 2019, 11:54:31 AM »
Having said all that, if the furnace is working properly it's more unhealthy to stand behind a car with a working engine, if it's CO that you're worried about.  I dont know if the installer checked everything out properly, but if he did and all the instruments show everything is good, then maybe the issue is something else.

Offline Medic1982

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Re: Dizzy
« Reply #3 on: April 05, 2019, 08:43:10 AM »
Thank you Sergroum for your reply. I think I will approach my neighbor and let her know that it might need to be checked to be sure it`s working properly.

Online walker

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Re: Dizzy
« Reply #4 on: April 05, 2019, 11:37:59 AM »
Looking for some advice.
Last week my next door neighbor installed a high efficiency furnace. Intake and exhaust are located on the side of her house where my driveway is.
I had a work place CO poisoning many years ago and since I find I am very sensitive to even small amounts of CO and find I`m getting dizzy when I`m outside around it.
The installer put an extended exhaust tube so it sits above my truck, about 7 feet above the ground level so it would not be hit backing in.
I have 2 questions
First one is after a new install does the furnace need to be tuned, is this why I`m feeling like this.
Second could the exhaust not be run up through the chimney and avoid the exhaust in the driveway.
Looking for any advice on this problem
Thank you very much.

A new furnace does have an initial burn off, the heat exchanger comes coatred with an oil of some sort, which will release an odour in your home, this burn off could be what you experienced, but after the first couple run cycles, you should not experience this anymore

Offline Admin

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Re: Dizzy
« Reply #5 on: April 05, 2019, 11:38:53 AM »
Actually even though Clause 8.14.8 was revoked most appliance manuals say,

Quote
A vent shall not terminate directly above a sidewalk or paved driveway that is located between two single family dwellings and serves both dwellings.

We would need to know what appliance was installed.

Offline Sergroum

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Re: Dizzy
« Reply #6 on: April 11, 2019, 01:16:32 AM »
Looking for some advice.
Last week my next door neighbor installed a high efficiency furnace. Intake and exhaust are located on the side of her house where my driveway is.
I had a work place CO poisoning many years ago and since I find I am very sensitive to even small amounts of CO and find I`m getting dizzy when I`m outside around it.
The installer put an extended exhaust tube so it sits above my truck, about 7 feet above the ground level so it would not be hit backing in.
I have 2 questions
First one is after a new install does the furnace need to be tuned, is this why I`m feeling like this.
Second could the exhaust not be run up through the chimney and avoid the exhaust in the driveway.
Looking for any advice on this problem
Thank you very much.

A new furnace does have an initial burn off, the heat exchanger comes coatred with an oil of some sort, which will release an odour in your home, this burn off could be what you experienced, but after the first couple run cycles, you should not experience this anymore


the coating is on the outside of the heat exchanger. It wouldnt come out of exhaust. If I read the post correctly, the OP is concerned with a furnace his neighbour installed, not him himself.

Offline Porcupinepuffer

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Re: Dizzy
« Reply #7 on: April 11, 2019, 06:47:43 PM »
 A break in burn on a new furnace is going to burn off certain oils and solvents that were used with the brand new parts that have never been heated before. I don't care how clean something is or a coating is on the outside, this process is still going to happen and there will be smells and a dirty burn at first. This should be completely resolved pretty quickly tho with some good runtimes.

I think the OP's issue may require anxiety medication as the sight of water vapour from the exhaust of a clean burning natural gas high efficiency furnace is not likely giving off any CO level even remotely close enough to being harmful, let alone enough that they can magically now sense it from a past incident. Last I checked, people who've had previous CO poisoning never developed Marvel comic book super powers to then detect it sooner.