Author Topic: Furnace venting downtown  (Read 3261 times)

Offline Porcupinepuffer

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Furnace venting downtown
« on: July 10, 2014, 03:22:26 PM »
Came across an odd-ball job a couple days ago that I'm not sure about, nor is the boss. We had this electric to gas furnace to do right in the middle of downtown Ottawa about a 30 second walk from where all the homeless bums hang out all day. I was curious about venting and what is and isn't allowed in this particular instance.
We can ONLY vent out the front of the house. It's a semi-detached with only 10 feet left to right in the front. There's literally only one spot we can legally vent it that we're not in the way of a door/window/gas meter/hydro meter/dryer vent.
The issue is whether we can legally vent here, or if we have to go up 7 or so feet. The house is about 10 feet in from the road, and roughly 6 feet in from the sidewalk. But the whole stretch of this road is extended by the sidewalk with additional slabs of cement that make it seem like it's just one giant wide sidewalk going right across the front of this house. It's not a shared paved sidewalk or driveway, but it somehow seems like it may fall into this category depending on whether it is and isn't the homeowners property and what the city owns.
We're wondering if the venting would somehow not be legal to vent at normal height through the foundation since we're basically right next to the sidewalk where people are always walking by it. I know the city owns a certain amount of property leading inward to the home owners property, but I'm not sure if we're allowed to install this vent here, or if we have to go up high with it or what. We walked down the road to look at other houses, and as far as we could see, nobody else had any 636 venting running out the front... We're also concerned about the idiot bums coming over and trying to get stoned on the CO2 and water vapor... It's a real PITA job altogether.
Any opinions appreciated.

Offline Admin

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Re: Furnace venting downtown
« Reply #1 on: July 10, 2014, 04:47:04 PM »
Clause 8.14.8(a) has alot of history.

In 2005, TSSA FS-67-05 amended it by adding,
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This does not apply to noncondensing appliances;

In 2007, CSA released the B149.1S1-07 Supplement No 1, which was written like this,
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Clause 8.14.8(a) directly above a paved sidewalk or paved driveway that is located between two single-family dwellings and serves both dwellings; Note: This does not apply to noncondensing appliances.

When the TSSA adopted the B149.1S1-07 they amended Clause 8.14.8(a) with FS-098-08,
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8.14.8(a) directly above a paved sidewalk or paved driveway that is located between two single-family dwellings and serves both dwellings; Note: This does not apply to non- condensing appliances.

In 2009, TSSA FS-144-09 it was amended to,
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8.14.8(a) directly above a paved sidewalk or paved driveway that is located between two single- family dwellings and serves both dwellings; Note: This does not apply to non-condensing appliances.

In 2010, TSSA FS-160-09 revoked Clause 8.14.8(a).

In the new B149.1-10 it reads,
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Clause 8.14.8 - A vent shall not terminate
(a) where it may cause hazardous frost or ice accumulations on adjacent property surfaces;

I was suprised to see TSSA FS-200-12-R2 did not amend Clause 8.14.8(a).  They must have been happy with CSA's revision.

I would think that if all the moisture or frost stays on your client's property there is no issue venting straight out, 1' from grade.  I would ask the client to provide property line documents otherwise I would follow Clause 8.14.8(b),

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(b) less than 7 ft (2.1 m) above a paved sidewalk or a paved driveway that is located on public property;

You could snorkle and armaflex the vent up 7ft.  If it turns out the sidewalk, that could see moisture and frost, is not on public property then there is no need to snorkle.  If you're vent only protrudes 12" from the front of the house, it's unlikely it would blow moisture or frost onto an adjacent property, nor would the vent be on public property.

Is this a 2 pipe or 1 pipe system?  Hopefully you already have a 4" combustion air in which case you could use a 1 pipe system if the appliance is approved for non direct vent.  Then there would be no issue venting beside the dryer vent.  There is no issue venting or having an intake near the hydro meter.  And technically you can vent right beside, above or below a gas meter.  Just buy a screened regulator vent fitting, from Convex, and pipe the regulator away so that the appliance vent, if higher than the regulator, is not within 3' horizontally of the regulator vent outlet. If you extend the regulator vent above the appliance vent then we only need an actual clearance distance of 3' rather then following the 3' horizontal rule.  If you use an intake vent it would have to be 3' away from the regulator vent outlet unless you paid Enbridge to install an OPCO regulator which would reduce the clearance to the intake pipe to 1'.

Some Enbridge fitters would be unhappy if you snorkled or extended their regulator vent, so you may want to just pay them to do it.

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Clause 4.6.2 - No person other than an employee or person authorized by the supplier or distributor shall perform any alterations, repairs, tests, services, removals, changes, installations, connections, or any other type of work on the supplier’s or distributor’s system.

Offline Porcupinepuffer

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Re: Furnace venting downtown
« Reply #2 on: September 04, 2014, 01:19:01 PM »
Yeah, I still have no idea what's going on with that job. Last I heard nothing has been done. But I think we would have needed to an answer on exactly what is and isn't his property.
Thanks for the references.

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Re: Furnace venting downtown
« Reply #3 on: September 04, 2014, 02:14:05 PM »
Since my last post the TSSA has released another amendment package, FS-212-14, which takes effect October 1, 2014.  FS-160-09 had already revoked this Clause, but I suspect they forgot to re add it to FS-200-12 when the B149.1-10 became Code in Ontario.

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Clause 8.14.8(a) is revoked.

Background: Hazardous frost or ice accumulations are not fuel-related hazards.

If the area in question is not on public property then you have nothing to worry about.  Otherwise, if it's public property, follow Clause 8.14.8(b).