Author Topic: Water Heater Relief Valve - Is this to code?  (Read 2725 times)

Offline walker

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Water Heater Relief Valve - Is this to code?
« on: September 30, 2015, 09:24:08 AM »
I came across this setup the other day and I was wondering if this allowed,  The T&P is piped directly into a drain.

I was under the impression that it must terminate no more 12 inches above the floor and not be directly piped in to a drain.

Can anyone weigh in on this?




Offline Admin

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Re: Water Heater Relief Valve - Is this to code?
« Reply #1 on: September 30, 2015, 09:54:57 AM »
I agree, both the Gas Code and Building Code do not allow a relief valve to be piped directly into a drain.

From the B149.1-10,

Quote
Clause 7.26.2 - The temperature and pressure relief device on a tank type water heater or the pressure relief device provided for an instantaneous (tankless) water heater shall have a discharge pipe of a size at least equal to the nominal size of the device outlet. The discharge pipe shall terminate not more than 12 in (300 mm) above the floor.   

From the OBC Article 7.6.1.12,

Quote
(4) Every indirect service water heater shall be equipped with,
(a) a pressure relief valve, and
(b) a temperature relief valve on every storage tank that forms part of the system.
(5) Every pipe that conveys water from a temperature relief, pressure relief, or a combined temperature and pressure relief valve shall,
(a) be of a size at least equal to the size of the outlet of the valve,
(b) be rigid, slope downward from the valve, and,
(i) terminate with an indirect connection above a floor drain, sump or other safe location, with an air break of not more than 300 mm, or
(ii) terminate at a distance not less than 150 mm and not more than 300 mm from a floor and discharge vertically down,

(c) have no thread at its outlet, and


Offline walker

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Re: Water Heater Relief Valve - Is this to code?
« Reply #2 on: September 30, 2015, 09:57:04 AM »
there is a whole complex that all have the exact setup. Is it possible they got some sort of variance to allow it?

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Re: Water Heater Relief Valve - Is this to code?
« Reply #3 on: September 30, 2015, 04:09:35 PM »
It's unlikely the TSSA would issue a blanket variance due to the fact the Gas Code and Building Code do not allow the relief to be piped directly into a drain.

It never hurts to ask though.  The alternative would be installing a drain pan, with a higher side wall, under the water heater, and piping that drain pan into the drainage system.


Offline Sergroum

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Re: Water Heater Relief Valve - Is this to code?
« Reply #4 on: October 02, 2015, 10:17:04 PM »
Are these water heaters on a second floor of a commercial building?

Offline walker

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Re: Water Heater Relief Valve - Is this to code?
« Reply #5 on: October 02, 2015, 10:34:10 PM »
Nope. They are on the second floor of a townhome.

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Re: Water Heater Relief Valve - Is this to code?
« Reply #6 on: October 05, 2015, 06:32:23 PM »
Is that door combustible?  Most GSW manuals require 5.5" clearance from the front of the water heater to combustible material.  I have also had inspectors enforce a 5.5" clearance from that gas valve to the door, as per the attachment.

Some inspectors would consider those plastic drain lines as being combustible material, and would want them relocated away from the front of the water heater as well.

I would verify the clearances and disconnect the relief tubing and just leave the standard relief tube installed.  Record the modifications on a work order have the client sign it.  Now the client can reconnect everything once you leave.

Offline walker

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Re: Water Heater Relief Valve - Is this to code?
« Reply #7 on: October 05, 2015, 06:38:51 PM »
The door is definitely combustible.  Thanks for the info something to keep in mind going forward.  If they ever do an inspection at that complex there is probably 100 units with the same exact setup.