Author Topic: Ontario Building Code 2014  (Read 10534 times)

Offline enzof

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Ontario Building Code 2014
« on: January 26, 2014, 07:26:56 AM »
Is anyone aware of the code changes for residential installations for 2014 as far the Ontario Building Code is concerned?
If I'm reading correctly, I see that programmable thermostats and duct sealing on the supply is mandatory?
Also 'heat traps' for water heaters?
ECM motors by years end?

Does anyone have further knowledge?

Regards,

Enzo

Offline harshal

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Re: Ontario Building Code 2014
« Reply #1 on: January 26, 2014, 08:48:55 AM »
Not sure about it.bcoz some people doesn't know how to use the programming mode so its defeats the purpose of it.its not really useful in some cases.in fact some time create the nuisance service call.I was attending the service call and the wifi thermostat was installed but the customer got no clue.it could be interesting if t
hey implement this codes

Offline Admin

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Re: Ontario Building Code 2014
« Reply #2 on: January 26, 2014, 09:53:19 AM »
A builder has many options and standards to choose from when building a home in Ontario.  SB-12 Packages A - M, EnerGuide80, Energy Star, R2000 and LEED all have their own requirements.  It looks like the 2012 OBC has adopted a few of the changes you mentioned.

Download the Highlights of 2012 OBC Changes Document - Here


Quote
6.2.4.3. Construction and Installation of Ducts and Plenums
(11) Where a supply duct or return duct is located in an unconditioned space or outdoors, all joints of the ductwork shall be sealed to a Class A seal level in accordance with the SMACNA, "HVAC Duct Construction Standards – Metal and Flexible".

(12) Where a supply duct is located in a conditioned space, the ductwork shall be sealed to a Class C seal level in accordance with the SMACNA, "HVAC Duct Construction Standards – Metal and Flexible".


12.3.1.3. Temperature Control in Dwelling Units
(1) Except as provided in Sentence (3) and except where space heating energy is provided by a solid fuel-burning appliance or a ground source heat pump, the indoor air temperature in a dwelling unit shall be controlled by at least one programmable thermostatic control device.
(2) The programmable thermostatic control device required in Sentence (1) shall,
(a) allow the setting of different air temperatures for at least,
(i) four time periods per day, and
(ii) two different day-types per week,
(b) include a manual override, and
(c) allow the setting of the air temperature to,
(i) 13°C or lower in heating mode, and
(ii) 29°C or higher in cooling mode, where airconditioning is provided.
(3) A manual thermostatic control device is permitted if it,
(a) controls a heating or cooling system where the heating or cooling capacity is not more than 2 kW, or
(b) serves an individual room or space.

12.3.1.4. Hot Water Piping Insulation
(1) Hot water pipes that are vertically connected to a hot water storage tank shall have heat traps on both inlet and outlet piping as close as practical to the tank, except where the tank,
(a) has an integral heat trap, or
(b) serves a recirculating system.
(2) The first 2.5 m of hot water outlet piping of a hot water storage tank serving a non-recirculating system shall be insulated to provide a thermal resistance of not less than RSI 0.62.
(3) The inlet pipe of a hot water storage tank between the heat trap and the tank serving a non-recirculating system shall be insulated to provide a thermal resistance of not less than RSI 0.62.

12.3.1.5. Residential Furnaces After December 31, 2014
(1) Sentence (2) applies to construction for which a permit has been applied for after December 31, 2014.
(2) A furnace serving a dwelling unit shall be equipped with an electronically commutated motor.

12.3.1.6. Energy Supply for Kitchen and Laundry Facilities After December 31, 2014
(1) This Article applies to construction for which a permit has been applied for after December 31, 2014.
(2) In order to supply energy to cooking appliances and clothes dryers, every kitchen and laundry space shall be provided with,
(a) an electrical outlet,
(b) a natural gas line, or
(c) a propane line.

Programmable thermostats, water heater heat traps and ECM furnaces all seem to have been added to the 2012 OBC.  Some changes only apply to permits after 2014.  For laundry rooms and kitchens we now have the option to install an electrical outlet OR gas line.

The 2012 OBC also amended Article 9.8.8.6 and now all AC's on balconies must be installed on a stand, regardless of the distance to a railing.

Quote
9.8.8.6. Guards Designed Not to Facilitate Climbing
(1) Guards required by Article 9.8.8.1., except those in industrial occupancies and where it can be shown that the location and size of openings do not represent a hazard, shall be designed so that no member, attachment or opening located between 140 mm and 900 mm above the floor or walking surface protected by the guard will facilitate climbing.

As far as I can tell taping all the ductwork is an Energy Star requirement.  You can download the 2012 Energy Star for New Homes Standard - Here

Quote
4.7.2.3 Duct Sealing
(a) Except for 4.6.5.3(d), heating and cooling system ducts shall be sealed as follows:
(i) seal all supply transverse joints, branch take-offs, branch supply joints and manufactured beaded joints on round perimeter pipes located on all floors.
(ii) for common return ducts, the more stringent of (1) or (2) shall apply:
(1) The drop to the furnace and at least one horizontal meter of return duct(s) measured from the furnace/air handler connection must be sealed with tape or mastic approved for the application; or
(2) Within a framed or closed mechanical room, all the return ducts, including joist returns, must be sealed with tape or mastic approved for the application.
NOTE: See Figure 1 for an illustration of these requirements.
(b) HRV/ERV, integrated HRV air handlers, and IMS connections

I don't even see a Section 4.6.5.3(d) in the Energy Star document.   :-\

Offline enzof

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Re: Ontario Building Code 2014
« Reply #3 on: January 26, 2014, 03:56:29 PM »
Thanks for the links to the documents.

Found in:

6.2.4.3. (12) Where a supply duct is located in a conditioned
space, the ductwork shall be sealed to a Class C seal level in
accordance with the SMACNA, “HVAC Duct Construction
Standards – Metal and Flexible”.


Offline Admin

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Re: Ontario Building Code 2014
« Reply #4 on: January 26, 2014, 07:42:30 PM »
Good find!  I checked the last OBC and it didn't have that Article.  It looks like all supply ductwork must be taped now.

Unless the equipment was installed in an unconditioned space like the attic I don't see the benefit with taping.  A properly installed duct doesn't leak air and any air leakage would be contained in the house anyway.

I took a recent upgrade course for the OPA rebate program and it was 8 hours of how to tape ducts LOL!

Offline Admin

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Re: Ontario Building Code 2014
« Reply #5 on: September 18, 2015, 11:20:20 AM »
I have seen a case where the building inspector has failed an inspection, citing OBC Article 12.3.1.6.  The inspector wanted future tees for the stove and dryer installed.

A lot of people misinterpret OBC Article 12.3.1.6,

Quote
12.3.1.6. Energy Supply for Kitchen and Laundry Facilities After December 31, 2014
(1) This Article applies to construction for which a permit has been applied for after December 31, 2014.
(2) In order to supply energy to cooking appliances and clothes dryers, every kitchen and laundry space shall be provided with,
(a) an electrical outlet,
(b) a natural gas line, or
(c) a propane line.

This means that every laundry room or kitchen shall have an electrical outlet OR gas line.  Both are not required.  The OBC should be amended to add the word "or" after (a) an electrical outlet.  There is also no requirement to leave future tees.  I don't really understand the intent here.  Wouldn't most gas stoves and gas dryers still require 120V?  It probably means we can eliminate the 240V plug if we install a gas line with a 120V plug.

Quote
12.3.1.6. Energy Supply for Kitchen and Laundry Facilities After December 31, 2014
(1) This Article applies to construction for which a permit has been applied for after December 31, 2014.
(2) In order to supply energy to cooking appliances and clothes dryers, every kitchen and laundry space shall be provided with,
(a) an electrical outlet, or
(b) a natural gas line, or
(c) a propane line.

Offline Porcupinepuffer

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Re: Ontario Building Code 2014
« Reply #6 on: September 28, 2015, 07:43:52 AM »
The problem with that is that it can be read to imply you don't need any electrical outlet and that a gas line, or propane line is all you need.
It also seems a lot of people don't understand how easy it is to splice in Tee's for later use. A lot of people think if a Tee isn't available that they're screwed, or that it will cost more money when a tech goes to add future appliances. I don't know of any tech's that offer a discounts on gas runs because a future tee is already installed. It only saves 5-10 minutes of work from adding one.